Getting back in the saddle

September has been pretty crazy for me. The temperatures were way too hot a week ago – upper 90s. And then one of our forest fires got worse and the smoke rolled in. This smoke was dropping ash, too. So it was too hot to run plus the air quality was poor. As a result, I was feeling a little lethargic and not motivated to write.

But weather is ever changing in Colorado. On Monday night the temps dropped and by Tuesday we were over 60 degrees cooler with a dusting of snow on the ground. It picked up again in the late afternoon and we probably got no more than an inch. In the mountains it was a different story. Some areas had close to 2 feet. I follow a Facebook page of people who are hiking the Colorado Trail (I didn’t but my brother did). I was very concerned about folks on the trail. It sounds like most had been tracking the storm and took a few days off in mountain towns. A couple tapped out. Clearly some were not prepared for the quick change of weather.

As for me, I went running yesterday. I enjoy running in cool weather. It was 36 degrees and I loved it. The weather is gradually warming again but hopefully no more 90 degree days.

I have found that I have been more productive, too. I got some returns taken care of at Lowes, new wiper blades for my car, and today I’m going to look into new tires. I also got my flu shot taken care of.

It’s important for me to stay busy. We had had a trip planned for Spain in late September. That’s not happening, of course, so it’s a little depressing. I also keep seeing old travel pics in my memory feed on Facebook. However, we do have a trip planned to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in October. It’s not Spain, but it is a vacation, so I am looking forward to it.

I just have to keep busy! One day I look forward to going to Europe again. One day . . .

Lakeview Campground (Leadville, CO)

We recently spent three nights at Lakeview Campground just south of Leadville, Colorado. It overlooks Twin Lakes and is a popular destination for canoers, kayakers, paddle boarders, fishermen, and hikers. It sits at an elevation of 9,500 feet, so even in the summer it can be quite chilly at night. When I checked the temperature on each of the mornings we were there, it was in the low 40s.

From my house north of Denver it took us about 2 hours and 20 minutes to get there via I-70, then turning south at Cooper Mountain and following the signs to Leadville and Twin Lakes.

The campground is run by the National Forest Service and during the 2020 season the cost is $24 a night. Four of the eight loops have reservable campsites and the other four loops have sites available on a first come, first serve basis.

Lakeview Campground has vault toilets on each loop. This year they had signs posted strongly urging people to wear masks. I brought my own water as they said water had been turned off this year. As it turned out they did actually have a large tank on our loop (600 liters). All sites have picnic tables (wooden) and firepits. Firewood is available from camp host, but it’s cheaper to bring it in.

My Thoughts

The view here was indeed spectacular. The picture was taken at my campsite. We were on the B loop as I had heard it had the best views. Unfortunately, I had picked a bad site. My golden rule is to always get a site on the outside of the loop and somehow I managed to screw that up. Anyhow, the site was nice and big. My brother, who is hiking the Colorado Trail, stayed with us for 2 nights and there was plenty of room for our big tent and his small hiking tent.

If I were to stay here again, I would NOT stay on the B loop. As beautiful as its views were, it turned out to be very noisy for a couple of reasons. We discovered that there were a ton of dispersed campers right outside the campground and on the hill above us. This is legal on National Forest land but unfortunately, these campers come and use the vault toilet (and helped themselves to water). They were very loud the first night. Cars were always going around the loop. I pay $24 a night, yet these people freeload and help themselves to the facilities. It’s not right and I wish the Forest Service could do something about it.

We also discovered later on that the only other water tank on loop E ran out, so people were coming up to get water from our tank. The constant flow of traffic was annoying.

The spot we were at also to be in a bit of a wind tunnel. I’m not sure if the lower loops were better but I do know I would not want to stay here again and risk it. Every afternoon the storm clouds started to form and we got quick showers accompanied by brief heavy winds. One day they nearly blew our tent away!

That being said, I did like that this campground was pest free–no mosquitoes, no little critters. We checked out White Star campground closer to Twin Lakes and thought it looked nice, but I would worry about mosquitoes. We also worried because it had bear boxes, whereas our campground did not.

Overall, I would give this a 3-star rating. Good location, nice spots, but our loop, being close to the dispersed campers, was less than ideal.

 

 

 

Crazy Colorado weather

I usually love this time of year. Temps are typically in the 80s and we get afternoon thunderstorms to cool things off and keep everything green without having to water so much. But this June is anything but typical. We haven’t had any of our usual thunderstorms and the temperatures have been hot. (I must add that some people are happy about the lack of thunderstorms because we’ve had a lot of hail damage in recent years).

Earlier this week it was in the 90s (94 on Tuesday). I did an evening run between 7 and 8 – about the latest I can go – and the temperature was 85.  But thankfully the weather changed today. I felt like I was back in Oregon with the continual rain we had most of the afternoon and again this evening. I was able to go for a late afternoon run. It was 54 and only a raindrop or two at the time. My pace was 1 minute 30 seconds faster per mile than it was 2 days ago. I felt like I was flying. This is one reason I’d love to live back in the NW as I love cool, drizzly weather.

Tonight I walked our dog, a 12-year-old pug. Typically my husband walks him but he doesn’t like the rain. Our pug Spanky grew up in Colorado and does fantastic with snow. But he is not a fan of the rain. We just did a quick walk around the circle as it was a steady rain. Once he ran home with us when a huge thunderstorm came in quickly and we had lightning all around (later followed by huge hail that damaged my car). He’s a tough little dog but he’s older now and can’t run as fast.

I think tomorrow will be similar and I’m just fine with that!104416693_1138438396529760_3907492351450700061_n