Summer 2020: road tripping around Colorado

Even though this summer has definitely been a strange one and far from normal, I’ve managed to keep busy in large part due to my brother hiking the Colorado Trail. We took him to the trailhead (45 minutes from our house), and then did three road trips to see him as he progressed on his hike and to pick him up when he finished. All together we put more than 1500 miles on my car. But no complaints. I got to see many cool towns in Colorado that I’d either just passed through or never got to see before. I thought I’d share some of the highlights of my summer. I’m lucky to live in such a scenic state.

Top row: Pagosa Springs, Creede, Colorado Trail (Durango), Silverton

Second row: Silverton, San Juan Skyway, Chimney Rocks

Third row: Independence Pass, San Juan Mountain Range

Fourth row: Big-horned sheep, Bethoud

Fifth row: Twin Lakes region

Lakeview Campground (Leadville, CO)

We recently spent three nights at Lakeview Campground just south of Leadville, Colorado. It overlooks Twin Lakes and is a popular destination for canoers, kayakers, paddle boarders, fishermen, and hikers. It sits at an elevation of 9,500 feet, so even in the summer it can be quite chilly at night. When I checked the temperature on each of the mornings we were there, it was in the low 40s.

From my house north of Denver it took us about 2 hours and 20 minutes to get there via I-70, then turning south at Cooper Mountain and following the signs to Leadville and Twin Lakes.

The campground is run by the National Forest Service and during the 2020 season the cost is $24 a night. Four of the eight loops have reservable campsites and the other four loops have sites available on a first come, first serve basis.

Lakeview Campground has vault toilets on each loop. This year they had signs posted strongly urging people to wear masks. I brought my own water as they said water had been turned off this year. As it turned out they did actually have a large tank on our loop (600 liters). All sites have picnic tables (wooden) and firepits. Firewood is available from camp host, but it’s cheaper to bring it in.

My Thoughts

The view here was indeed spectacular. The picture was taken at my campsite. We were on the B loop as I had heard it had the best views. Unfortunately, I had picked a bad site. My golden rule is to always get a site on the outside of the loop and somehow I managed to screw that up. Anyhow, the site was nice and big. My brother, who is hiking the Colorado Trail, stayed with us for 2 nights and there was plenty of room for our big tent and his small hiking tent.

If I were to stay here again, I would NOT stay on the B loop. As beautiful as its views were, it turned out to be very noisy for a couple of reasons. We discovered that there were a ton of dispersed campers right outside the campground and on the hill above us. This is legal on National Forest land but unfortunately, these campers come and use the vault toilet (and helped themselves to water). They were very loud the first night. Cars were always going around the loop. I pay $24 a night, yet these people freeload and help themselves to the facilities. It’s not right and I wish the Forest Service could do something about it.

We also discovered later on that the only other water tank on loop E ran out, so people were coming up to get water from our tank. The constant flow of traffic was annoying.

The spot we were at also to be in a bit of a wind tunnel. I’m not sure if the lower loops were better but I do know I would not want to stay here again and risk it. Every afternoon the storm clouds started to form and we got quick showers accompanied by brief heavy winds. One day they nearly blew our tent away!

That being said, I did like that this campground was pest free–no mosquitoes, no little critters. We checked out White Star campground closer to Twin Lakes and thought it looked nice, but I would worry about mosquitoes. We also worried because it had bear boxes, whereas our campground did not.

Overall, I would give this a 3-star rating. Good location, nice spots, but our loop, being close to the dispersed campers, was less than ideal.

 

 

 

Back from camping but exhausted

I really think I am too old for camping. I enjoy it but I never sleep well.  The first night there was a lot of noise from dispersed campers (another post on that later), the second night we slept well, but last night a camper came in late at night (her dad and brother were already there but she came in separate car with canoe). We went to bed at 9:30 but they yacked by the campfire until 12 at least. If I hadn’t been in bed already I might have gone over and asked them to keep in down. Most campgrounds request quiet by 10 pm.

Anyhow, we had a good time catching up with my brother who is hiking the Colorado Trail. I am so happy to be sleeping in a regular bed tonight. The scenery was spectacular, but the weather was really unpredictable in the afternoon. That is typical for Colorado, however.

The picture is the view from our campsite, Lakeview Campground near Twin Lakes, Colorado.

On the trail again

Last Thursday, July 16, my oldest brother started hiking the 485 mile Colorado Trail. It’s part of the Continental Divide Trail (CDT), but not many people hike the entire CDT in one shot. It’s considered the most difficult of the 3 thru hikes in the US, which also include the Pacific Crest (PCT) and the Appalachian Trail (AT).

My brother did the PCT when he was 19 and 40 years later he did the AT. He had planned to hike the PCT again this year but then Covid-19 hit. (Hikers need to resupply and clean up at small towns along the route, and with the virus, many were closed down to hikers) So he decided on the CT instead. Colorado towns are open now so he’s keeping his fingers crossed than our numbers stay down and we don’t have any more closures. It should take him about 6 weeks. Younger hikers can easily hike it 4 weeks, but my brother is now north of 60.

He flew into Denver on Wednesday and we took him to the Waterton Canyon trailhead southwest of Denver on Thursday morning. He’s starting slow – 10ish miles a day – until he gets used to the altitude. We’ll see him in 2 weeks when we go camping at Twin Lakes. I had planned that camping trip back in January before I knew he was hiking. When he told me he was doing the CT, I remembered that the trail passed right by our campground. So we’ll bring him a resupply box and treat him to a beer and burger in Twin Lakes Village.

I’m following his progress on Garmin GPS upload. In Colorado cell service is pretty poor in the mountains so this is an essential tool for hikers. So far he appears to be on schedule.

Here are some pics from the sendoff: