I really am baffled by Governor Noem

Yesterday I watched a clip from the “The Ingraham Angle,” a Fox News program (something I rarely do) that featured Gov. Kristi Noem of South Dakota. I listened to the interview after I read about the plans for the famous Sturgis Motorcycle Rally to continue as planned from August 7-16. Usually they get about 500,000 people pass through this small city of 7,000, but this year they’re expecting half that. Masks won’t be required and you can pretty much toss social distancing out the door.

I was flabbergasted when I heard Gov. Noem state the following in response to her critics (this is a direct quote): “What works is washing your hands and making good decisions.” Literally, my jaw dropped to the floor. Yes, we all have become diligent hand washers and users of hand sanitizers, but unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you should know that the real problem is that this disease is spread through the air. The early zealousness about sanitizing surfaces has subsided somewhat and now the focus is on masks. And by the way, good decisions don’t happen when fueled by alcohol.

Yes, South Dakota has a much lower death rate than New York (15 vs. 167 per 1000) but have you ever been to South Dakota? I have. It’s basically farm land and plains. The biggest city is Sioux Falls with a population of 190,000. The population density of South Dakota is 2,109 people per square mile. In New York that number is 26,403. Quite a difference. Comparing the two states is ridiculous.

Futhermore, once the Sturgis Rally is over, those people will go back home and potentially carry the virus with them. It’s irresponsible and demonstrates once again the selfish behavior of Americans. So sad.

Lakeview Campground (Leadville, CO)

We recently spent three nights at Lakeview Campground just south of Leadville, Colorado. It overlooks Twin Lakes and is a popular destination for canoers, kayakers, paddle boarders, fishermen, and hikers. It sits at an elevation of 9,500 feet, so even in the summer it can be quite chilly at night. When I checked the temperature on each of the mornings we were there, it was in the low 40s.

From my house north of Denver it took us about 2 hours and 20 minutes to get there via I-70, then turning south at Cooper Mountain and following the signs to Leadville and Twin Lakes.

The campground is run by the National Forest Service and during the 2020 season the cost is $24 a night. Four of the eight loops have reservable campsites and the other four loops have sites available on a first come, first serve basis.

Lakeview Campground has vault toilets on each loop. This year they had signs posted strongly urging people to wear masks. I brought my own water as they said water had been turned off this year. As it turned out they did actually have a large tank on our loop (600 liters). All sites have picnic tables (wooden) and firepits. Firewood is available from camp host, but it’s cheaper to bring it in.

My Thoughts

The view here was indeed spectacular. The picture was taken at my campsite. We were on the B loop as I had heard it had the best views. Unfortunately, I had picked a bad site. My golden rule is to always get a site on the outside of the loop and somehow I managed to screw that up. Anyhow, the site was nice and big. My brother, who is hiking the Colorado Trail, stayed with us for 2 nights and there was plenty of room for our big tent and his small hiking tent.

If I were to stay here again, I would NOT stay on the B loop. As beautiful as its views were, it turned out to be very noisy for a couple of reasons. We discovered that there were a ton of dispersed campers right outside the campground and on the hill above us. This is legal on National Forest land but unfortunately, these campers come and use the vault toilet (and helped themselves to water). They were very loud the first night. Cars were always going around the loop. I pay $24 a night, yet these people freeload and help themselves to the facilities. It’s not right and I wish the Forest Service could do something about it.

We also discovered later on that the only other water tank on loop E ran out, so people were coming up to get water from our tank. The constant flow of traffic was annoying.

The spot we were at also to be in a bit of a wind tunnel. I’m not sure if the lower loops were better but I do know I would not want to stay here again and risk it. Every afternoon the storm clouds started to form and we got quick showers accompanied by brief heavy winds. One day they nearly blew our tent away!

That being said, I did like that this campground was pest free–no mosquitoes, no little critters. We checked out White Star campground closer to Twin Lakes and thought it looked nice, but I would worry about mosquitoes. We also worried because it had bear boxes, whereas our campground did not.

Overall, I would give this a 3-star rating. Good location, nice spots, but our loop, being close to the dispersed campers, was less than ideal.

 

 

 

Back from camping but exhausted

I really think I am too old for camping. I enjoy it but I never sleep well.  The first night there was a lot of noise from dispersed campers (another post on that later), the second night we slept well, but last night a camper came in late at night (her dad and brother were already there but she came in separate car with canoe). We went to bed at 9:30 but they yacked by the campfire until 12 at least. If I hadn’t been in bed already I might have gone over and asked them to keep in down. Most campgrounds request quiet by 10 pm.

Anyhow, we had a good time catching up with my brother who is hiking the Colorado Trail. I am so happy to be sleeping in a regular bed tonight. The scenery was spectacular, but the weather was really unpredictable in the afternoon. That is typical for Colorado, however.

The picture is the view from our campsite, Lakeview Campground near Twin Lakes, Colorado.

Moving day and getting ready for camping

Today my youngest son (22 years old) is moving back home. But don’t think badly of him. He graduated Cum Laude in Computer Science from University of Colorado in May and has been continuing to work on a research project with a prof there. Most leases in Boulder run from August to the end of July, so he was enjoying a few months of down time before moving back home. I’m looking forward to it. Not sure if he is. But he is a very goal oriented person and plans to apply to grad school so he can move out next summer. In the meantime, we have a pet sitter!

That’s a good thing, as we’re taking off tomorrow for a 3-day camping trip. All very coincidentally,  we will happen to meet up with my brother who is hiking the Colorado Trail. He’s 2 weeks in. I’ll be bring him more JetBoil Fuel which is in short supply this summer as the CT has increased traffic this year.

He requested his favorite hot dogs with sauerkraut, potato salad, and baked beans. While I won’t be making my mom’s recipe, I’m sure he’ll be happy. with Bush’s Baked Beans. I also found pre-mixed Bloody Mary’s for the next morning. He’s taking a zero day (no hiking) but perhaps we’ll go to Leadville which has quite a few geocaches. It’s the highest town in North America and just half an hour away.

In the meantime, I pray for everyone to make to make good choices. Wear a mask, don’t go to crowded events, and don’t be a whiny baby. Yes, many of us would rather be on a plane traveling to our vacation destination, but one summer of sacrifice is not asking a lot. My friend’s daughter is starting college next month. As much as I ‘d love to meet up with my friend for lunch, I’ve decided that’s not going to happen. It’s not worth the risk. We all need to make sacrifices to contain Covid-19.

On the trail again

Last Thursday, July 16, my oldest brother started hiking the 485 mile Colorado Trail. It’s part of the Continental Divide Trail (CDT), but not many people hike the entire CDT in one shot. It’s considered the most difficult of the 3 thru hikes in the US, which also include the Pacific Crest (PCT) and the Appalachian Trail (AT).

My brother did the PCT when he was 19 and 40 years later he did the AT. He had planned to hike the PCT again this year but then Covid-19 hit. (Hikers need to resupply and clean up at small towns along the route, and with the virus, many were closed down to hikers) So he decided on the CT instead. Colorado towns are open now so he’s keeping his fingers crossed than our numbers stay down and we don’t have any more closures. It should take him about 6 weeks. Younger hikers can easily hike it 4 weeks, but my brother is now north of 60.

He flew into Denver on Wednesday and we took him to the Waterton Canyon trailhead southwest of Denver on Thursday morning. He’s starting slow – 10ish miles a day – until he gets used to the altitude. We’ll see him in 2 weeks when we go camping at Twin Lakes. I had planned that camping trip back in January before I knew he was hiking. When he told me he was doing the CT, I remembered that the trail passed right by our campground. So we’ll bring him a resupply box and treat him to a beer and burger in Twin Lakes Village.

I’m following his progress on Garmin GPS upload. In Colorado cell service is pretty poor in the mountains so this is an essential tool for hikers. So far he appears to be on schedule.

Here are some pics from the sendoff:

Trip to Spain officially cancelled

I knew it was coming. First there was the news that the EU was not allowing travelers from the US. Then I got an e-mail from Norwegian Airlines. Our roundtrip flight to London-Gatwick in the fall was cancelled. While England is not a part of the EU, I figured that Norwegian would cancel the flight anyhow. The UK has announced that visitors must do a 14-day quarantine and not many people are going to want to do that.

Fortunately, the e-mail had a link to request a refund. I immediately filled it out and they have already sent a reply stating my refund has been processed and will be posted to my credit card. I haven’t seen it yet, but I’ll check every day. I’m keeping all my correspondence in case it doesn’t come through. Norwegian has had a lot of financial difficulties and I’m more than a little worried. We took them last year to Europe and while the price was good, the service was not the best. I swore I wouldn’t fly on them again, yet I get sucked in to another good deal before Covid-19 struck.

Now I just have to wait and see what happens with my EasyJet flight. It might not be cancelled (London – Barcelona) but I did manage to find a refund request form specifically for passengers affected by Covid-19. I hadn’t yet booked our return flight from Madrid.

English Countryside Vacation 2017

Back in the fall of 2017 my husband and I did a 3-week trip to England, Paris, and Iceland. This is the summary of the first part of the trip through the English countryside.

Day 1-2

After landing at Heathrow and weaving our way through customs and immigration, we somehow managed to find the coach to Bath. After about a 2-hour ride, we finally arrived in Bath only to find the streets flooded with rugby fans (apparently their club is pretty good.) We hailed a taxi to take us the short distance to our Bed & Breakfast, Bath Paradise House, a lovely 17-century mansion with an expansive view. From them on we walked as it really was quite convenient. We spent 2 nights here to get over our jet lag and to tour some of the unique Roman architecture of this city, including the Roman Baths.

Roman Baths
view from Bath Paradise House garden

Day 3

We picked up a rental car at Europcar in Bath. Yes, it was our first time driving in England. We had made reservations months in advance, so we did get an automatic. Driving on the left side of the road was not that difficult. However, driving on the narrow shoulder-less roads next to many stone walls was a bit nerve-wracking. But somehow we managed!

Anyhow, we made our way to Glastonbury. Many tourists skip this town and go to Salisbury because it’s closer to Stonehenge. However, it’s worth the detour. We first stopped at Glastonbury Tor, a terraced hill with a tall roofless tower, with far-reaching views. Like the Glastonbury Abbey, it dates back to the 7th century. We then made our way to the Abbey in town, before heading toward Salisbury. As you can see Glastonbury and Salisbury architecture is very different, as the Salisbury Cathedral (the tallest spire in England) was built in the 13th century.

Glastonbury Tor
Glastonbury Abbey
Salisbury Cathedral

Our lodging for the night was Cricket Field House. It was on the outskirts of town and less than 15 minutes away from Stonehenge. It was a little less convenient to downtown Salisbury (for dinner) but we managed to find parking easily that night. Our plan was to make an early getaway in the morning and it turned out well in that respect.

Day 4

We arrived to Stonehenge early before the line was long and hoards of tourists were there. It was a little underwhelming but I’m still glad I went. My brother recommended Avebury, which is nearby, and we did enjoy our time there a bit more. The rock formations are not as large but the village is cute and we enjoyed exploring while we did a little bit of geocaching.

Stonehenge
Avebury

After a long day, we made our way to Oxford. Trying to decide where to stay here proved to be difficult. Oxford proper can be very congested and sometimes you have to park and walk to your hotel as parking is not allowed in the central tourist area. Not feeling comfortable doing that, we opted to stay a bit outside of town at the Westwood Hotel. We didn’t particularly like this place and deemed it a bad choice. There is not good dining nearby so we had to eat at the overpriced hotel dining room. Our room was rather shabby and lacked the charm of the Bed & Breakfasts we had stayed in.

Day 5

Fortunately, Oxford made up for our poor choice of hotel. We did a ton of walking and exploring Oxford University. We did first tour Oxford Castle and Prison and found that to be a waste of time and money. My advice is just head toward High Street and start walking and checking out the wonderful architecture here.

Oxford University

Our next destination on our whirlwind tour was the Cotswolds. Now, if you love quaint English towns, this is the place to go and you could easily spend a week here. We only spent one night but we did enjoy it. We stayed at the Charingworth Manor, which is more like an inn than a B&B. However, the accommodations were comfortable and the dining room was better the Westwood. We didn’t feel like driving into Chipping Campden on a dark windy road, so we were happy to have a good meal there.

Charingworth Manor, with the typical honey-colored stone of the Cotswolds. Our rental car is the blue Kia station wagon in the middle.

Day 6

Time to explore the Cotswolds! With only a day we barely scratched the surface but we did get to seee a lovely English garden at Hidcote. It is known for its linked “rooms” of hedges, rare trees, shrubs and herbaceous borders. Highly recommended!

Hidcote Gardens

Next stop was Broadway Tower. It affords lovely views of the Cotswolds (when it’s not raining!). It was built in the late 1700s in the Saxon style. A nice restaurant is on the grounds, so it made a good lunch stop. We spent the rest of the afternoon perusing High Street in Broadway. Then we headed toward our next stop, the Welcombe Hotel, in Stratford-upon-Avon. Honestly, I don’t remember too much about this place. Much like Oxford, I wanted a place away from the main tourist area of Stratford and this fit the bill. It’s more like a country club. But it served our needs.

Enjoying the views from Broadway Tower before the rains roll in

Day 7

If you’re big into Shakespeare, then Stratford-upon-Avon is the place for you. We aren’t but we did enjoy doing a walk next to the Avon and doing a little shopping downtown. We honestly didn’t have much time to spend here anyhow. We were scheduled to meet up with my cousin in his home in Hitchin, before heading to Cambridge.

Stratford-upon-Avon – yes, it has that Shakespearean look!

Day 8 & 9

We stayed 2 nights at the Cambridge Hotel on the River Cam. This used to be a Hilton property and I was able to book a free night. This was actually a great choice. Cambridge is definitely busy, so easy access and a car park was important. That said, even with navigation, we made a few wrong turns but eventually found our way there.

The next day we stepped outside our comfort zone and did a touristy activity tour – a “punting” ride along the River Cam. Punts are flat-bottomed boats that are propelled much like a gondola. Unfortunately, it was raining, but it was still quite enjoyable and the tour guides do give you a lot of historical information on the town and University. Of course, I still recommend walking the town a bit. It does have quite a different feel from Oxford.

Punting along the River Cam
Bridge of Sighs, St. John’s College, Cambridge University

Day 10

We said good-bye to our rental car, hopped on the train to London, and transferred to another train to Paris. I’ll be posting more about travels in the future! My European travels are temporarily on hold but I hope you enjoy my trip down memory lane.