One thing not to do in the Smokies: Cades Cove

Cades Cove appears on most lists of top places to visit in Great Smoky Mountain National Park. So we decided to visit it on our last full day there on our trip in early October. The weather was good and we were certainly up for another scenic drive, as we were fully in love with the scenic beauty of the Park. However, it didn’t meet up to our expectations (except for the lovely drive there) and wouldn’t recommend it to anyone planning a visit there, unless you’re a cyclist. (The loop is closed to cars on Wednesday during the summer.)

First of all, a little background on Cades Cove. It’s about 34 miles southwest of Gatlinburg. The road from Gatlinburg, Hwy. 441, is not one way, but once you get to the loop, it does turn into a one-way road. The 11-mile loop around Cades Cove goes around the perimeter of the valley floor, which was first settled by European settlers between 1818 and 1821. Several of the restored original structures still stand, including three churches, a working grist mill, and cabins. The cove has a campground and a visitor’s center. Along the loop there are pull-outs and places to park (more on this later!)

Cades Cove

According to the National Park Service website, “It offers some of the best opportunities for wildlife viewing in the park. Large numbers of white-tailed deer are frequently seen, and sightings of black bear, coyote, ground hog, turkey, raccoon, skunk, and other animals are also possible.” Quite honestly, after seeing turkeys and a bear elsewhere in the park (like near our cabin) I was okay if I didn’t see anything. I see coyotes and racoons all the time at home, so perhaps we should have thought twice about going here. I know the mention of wildlife tends to draw crowds. Lesson learned!

We knew we wanted to do some hiking first. We decided to do a short, easy hike to Laurel Falls, right off 441. It’s only about 1.5 miles to the falls and the trail is paved the entire way. We got there plenty early, so the foot traffic wasn’t bad and we didn’t have to park far away (by now we were used to the crazy roadside parking situation). The fall colors were very just starting, but still it was a very beautiful hike with great views of the Park, as well.

The beginning of fall colors
Interesting fungi
Majestic views of the Smokies
Laurel Falls
Laurel Falls

After we finished up our hike and continued on our way. I sure loved all the green. Having lived outside my beloved Oregon for nearly 30 years, I forgot how much I crave the forest. But we don’t have cool vines like this in Oregon!

I could never be a monkey!

We had lunch at a nice picnic area at Metcalf Bottoms and then onto to the Sinks, a powerful roadside waterfall before continuing onto to Cades Coves

The Sinks – don’t go rafting or swimming here!
The windy but beautiful road to Cades Cove

We finally made it to Cades Cove, only to be warned by a temporary sign that said due to slow traffic it could take upwards of 4 hours to complete the loop! WHAT!!!! I was ready to turn around but my husband disregarded it and proceeded. As we drove at a snail’s pace around the park with the hundreds of other cars, we saw several of the old structures and places you could pull off. But even the pull offs were packed and seeing old cabins didn’t seem too exciting (we have plenty of those in Colorado.) We did finally find a nice pull off where we took pictures, but we had yet to see any of the elusive wildlife. So we continued on our way with the plan to stop at the visitor’s center at the end. But then traffic literally came to a halt. Seriously. We moved maybe .1 mile in half an hour. So I decided to get out and walk to the visitor’s center. I needed the lady’s room and it was about 1.5 miles away. I had gone about a tenth of a mile when another person came back and told me that traffic stopped because someone had seen a bear. SERIOUSLY? My burst bladder for a bear?

Honestly, I was quite surprised that park personnel allow this to happen. I’ve been to Yellowstone when buffalo are on the roads at times and rangers try to police the traffic as much as possible. In fact, I hardly saw any park rangers here during my entire trip in the Smokies.

While I highly recommend the scenic drive up to Cades Cove, I say skip the loop if it’s busy (pay attention to those signs!). You can exit out toward Townsend before you get to Cades Coves and circle back toward Pigeon Forge or Gatlinburg.