I’m officially “boosted” (Moderna #3)

A few weeks back I was distressed to hear that my state of Colorado was about at #4 in terms of Covid hospitalization rates in the US. I was quite surprised as roughly 73% of the population (12 and older) is vaccinated. But right now many hospitals are at or near capacity and have to turn away patients. On the same newscast I also heard that our state’s chief medical officer told vaccine providers that they could give boosters to anyone, no matter what the federal guidelines were (although it appears those guidelines may change soon).

I quickly checked around and found that that I was able to get an appointment at Walmart. Yes, I had to fib a little bit on the online appointment scheduler stating that I did indeed meet the qualification criteria, but this has always been a problem with the pharmacies. During the initial rollout people qualified but the pharmacies always lagged in updating their systems. Anyhow, when I was at Walmart, several people came in for walk in appointments. So I don’t feel bad.

Although I preferred the ease and comfort of the drive-thru clinic I had gone to for my first two vaccines, I found that Walmart was quite efficient and better set up than Walgreens or Safeway.

As a side note, I felt like I was in another country. In Boulder County we have a mask mandate but the Walmart I went to is in Adams County with no mask mandate. I wore my mask during the whole process but none of the pharmacy staff did. Oh well, I’m a proud Boulderite and we do stand out from the rest of the state.

I was prepared to battle the side effects. Sore arm? Yes, but not as bad as my flu shot. Tiredness? Yes, I fell asleep watching the Costa Rica – Honduras soccer match. (Costa Rica won!) The next day was horrible. Fever and chills and a headache. The good news was that by bedtime I was fine.

I feel good about getting my booster and doing my part, which also means continuing to wear a mask. I have a big trip planned for February to Costa Rica and I’m not letting Covid get in my way. In the meantime, I wish the holdouts, like my hair stylist, would get their vaccines.

Sedona: a wonderfully relaxing getaway

My husband has been bugging me for years that we should do a getaway to Sedona. As we live in Colorado, it’s just a short flight away (to Phoenix and then a 2 hour drive north.) So we finally decided to go in 2020 for our anniversary in April. But then the pandemic came and that plan went up in smoke.

However, we decided to try again in 2021. We discovered in 2021 that we liked staying in AirBNBs. Originally we had planned to stay in Sedona proper in a hotel but being that it was March this time (my birthday) and neither of us were vaccinated yet, we decided to skip the hotel and find an AirBNB in the Village of Oak Creek, just about 10 minutes south of Sedona. Good choice! It’s less crowded here and a lot less traffic. We stayed in a house just minutes away from shopping with tons of privacy, and of course, great views. Well, pretty much anymore in Sedona has great views but we feel that Oak Creek is a lot less hectic. The con is that there aren’t as many dining options. But that was the point – we wanted to stay away from crowded restaurants.

What to do: Well, first of all, Sedona is known as the day hike capital of the US. And from my observation, that’s a very accurate description. Since we were there only 3 nights, we devoted one day to hiking, although we could have easily done more. But for the non-hikers there’s plenty of shopping, “new age” activities such UFO tours and Vortex experiences, and your usual group tours. I’m not into new age stuff, but I did wish we could have gone to Slide Rock. I recall going there as a child. But it was too cold in March to do this. It’s a natural sandstone slide on Oak Creek. Not surprisingly, it’s super popular during the hot summer.

Slide Rock State Park (PC: azswimmingholes.com)

The hike we chose to do was the Bell Trail that takes off from the Bell Rock Trailhead and encircles Courthouse Rock. It’s about a 4 mile loop and is pretty easy with hardly any hill climbing, unless you decide to climb up to the Vortex at Bell Rock. Start early, though! This parking lot can get packed. Many people just chose to go up to the Vortex and by the time we returned the parking lot was packed. And this, as I mentioned, was in March! It was a little drizzly when we started but it cleared off quickly and we were treated to a beautiful hike.

View from our AirBNB

Courthouse Butte

Baby Bell Rock

Bell Rock

Another hugely popular trail is the Cathedral Rock trail. The picture below is from our vantage point on the Bell Trail. But it does have its own trailhead. I imagine it’s a zoo in the summer. They were doing some work there to prevent people from parking on the entrance road as it is near a residential area.

But if you’re not into hiking there is still plenty of sightseeing to be done. Two places I recommend are Sedona Airport Scenic Lookout with spectacular vistas of the Sedona area and also the Chapel of the Holy Cross, which is built into the rock cliff face.

Last but certainly not least, there’s plenty of shopping to be done. On the north side of town on 89A there are plenty of the typical touristy shops to get souvenirs and such. I couldn’t help myself and posed in front of these cute pink Javelina.

But for a more upscale shopping experience wander over to Tlaquepaque Arts & Shopping Village on the west side of 179. Even though I didn’t buy anything they did have a lot of interesting shops and galleries and I enjoyed the pueblo-like atmosphere there. It’s very interesting to look at all the Sycamore trees which the buildings seem to be built around.

Overall, I have to say that Sedona was a pleasant surprise. It was very temperate in March and during the pandemic the crowds weren’t bad. Fall would also be a great time to go as well. If you’re coming to enjoy the water activities along Oak Creek, well, obviously March would not be a good time. But try to hit it before it starts to get scorching hot in the summer months.

My husband dodged a COVID bullet

My husband plays volleyball with a group of adults here locally in Colorado. Their volleyball facility closed down for a while But in the summertime they still got together and played at outdoor sand courts. They returned to playing at the club in the fall. It was operating at reduced capacity and requiring masks while they played.

My husband hasn’t gone in a few weeks. He did consider going this week but because we have contracters in our house, he thought it would safer not to go. Talk about a smart choice! He got a text from one of the team members this past Friday notifying people she had tested positive for COVID. Then another team member who had opted out this week said she was quarantining due to possible exposure.

I’m hoping my husband stays home all month now. We’re going to Arizona the first week of March and don’t want anything throwing a wrench into our plans. It seems like it’s getting harder and harder to avoid it as more people are letting their guard down.

One thing people must remember is that even if you have had the vaccine, you can still pass it on to others. The vaccine activates your body’s immune response but does not prevent you from being an asymptomatic carrier. Please please please continue to wear your mask and socially distance. I’m not crazy about my husband’s volleyball team. They’re Trump supporters and really don’t think COVID is a big deal. However, this might be a wake-up call for some. One was bemoaning the fact that he was going to miss a pickle ball match and a birthday party. The woman who caught it at first wasn’t going to notify the facility but reluctantly she agreed.

Stay safe! We still have a long ways to go!

2016 PTSD – Election Night Eve

I just got back from a lovely walk with my pug Spanky. It’s hard to believe that a week ago we had snow and tonight it’s in the mid 50s (although it will get colder). Today it got up to 70.

Anyhow, late last week I was watching Stephen Colbert as I usually do before bed, and he referred to the anxiety so many are feeling here in the US as 2016 PTSD. So true! Everyone in my family has voted and we’re trying to be positive, but I remember four years ago feeling positive that we’d have our first woman president. Well, we all know what happened. In previous elections when the candidates I voted for didn’t win I never felt so down. But 2016 was different.

It’s been a long hard road to this election. The Covid-19 Pandemic has only made it worse. I hope people recognize Trump’s total mismanagement of it here in the US and vote him out. I know my 90-year-old aunt, a life long Republican, has voted for Biden. And the Lincoln Project gives me hope that other Republicans will vote for Biden. However, in the end, all we can do is wait and see because I don’t think anyone trusts pollsters anymore. Word is there might be a lot of “shy Trump supporters.” But as Colbert said, Trump supporters are anything but shy.

In the meantime, I’ve got a small bottle of bubbly chilling and on standby. It might be a few days, it might be a few weeks, or it might not happen at all. But at this point all we can do is pray.

Up and down weekend

I’ll start off with the good news! My oldest son rode his bike up Mt. Evans! That is one of the two 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado that have a road to the top, the other being Pikes Peak. Now, of course, he didn’t start at sea level, but his elevation gain was just over 7,000 feet and total round trip mileage was 58 miles. The elevation of Mt. Evans itself is 14,271 feet (4348 meters). This summer the road to the top is closed to cars due to Covid-19, so it did make it an ideal time (if there is such a thing!) to do it.

Doing this bike ride would be an accomplishment for anyone, but for my son, it is especially amazing. He has been a Type 1 diabetic for nearly 20 years. While he was young it was hard for him to compete in sports due to managing his blood sugars. But since he started wearing Dexcom’s Continual Glucose Monitor (CGM) five or so years ago, he has started to become more active. He now can look at his phone and know exactly what his numbers are without doing a finger prick. It’s truly an awesome medical device.

at the top of Mt. Evans 14,271 feet

Now about the downside of my weekend. I cut my finger on Saturday and required five stitches. I was cutting a watermelon and the knife got stuck. I yanked it out and it hit my finger. This is the second time I have cut my finger during the pandemic. The first time was on the tip of my pinkie while cutting an apple with a serrated knife. While not as deep it was a really tough one to bandage. I thought about going to the ER but I was a bit concerned as it was early on in the pandemic and we were in lock down. Fortunately, this second cut was easy to stitch, but it was sure painful when the doctor gave the lidocaine shots to numb my finger. I have put a picture below but don’t scroll down if you get queasy. I’m happy to say I haven’t had any throbbing at night, but I have to be careful still as it hurts if I knock it in to anything.

Ouch!

I really am baffled by Governor Noem

Yesterday I watched a clip from the “The Ingraham Angle,” a Fox News program (something I rarely do) that featured Gov. Kristi Noem of South Dakota. I listened to the interview after I read about the plans for the famous Sturgis Motorcycle Rally to continue as planned from August 7-16. Usually they get about 500,000 people pass through this small city of 7,000, but this year they’re expecting half that. Masks won’t be required and you can pretty much toss social distancing out the door.

I was flabbergasted when I heard Gov. Noem state the following in response to her critics (this is a direct quote): “What works is washing your hands and making good decisions.” Literally, my jaw dropped to the floor. Yes, we all have become diligent hand washers and users of hand sanitizers, but unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you should know that the real problem is that this disease is spread through the air. The early zealousness about sanitizing surfaces has subsided somewhat and now the focus is on masks. And by the way, good decisions don’t happen when fueled by alcohol.

Yes, South Dakota has a much lower death rate than New York (15 vs. 167 per 1000) but have you ever been to South Dakota? I have. It’s basically farm land and plains. The biggest city is Sioux Falls with a population of 190,000. The population density of South Dakota is 2,109 people per square mile. In New York that number is 26,403. Quite a difference. Comparing the two states is ridiculous.

Futhermore, once the Sturgis Rally is over, those people will go back home and potentially carry the virus with them. It’s irresponsible and demonstrates once again the selfish behavior of Americans. So sad.

Moving day and getting ready for camping

Today my youngest son (22 years old) is moving back home. But don’t think badly of him. He graduated Cum Laude in Computer Science from University of Colorado in May and has been continuing to work on a research project with a prof there. Most leases in Boulder run from August to the end of July, so he was enjoying a few months of down time before moving back home. I’m looking forward to it. Not sure if he is. But he is a very goal oriented person and plans to apply to grad school so he can move out next summer. In the meantime, we have a pet sitter!

That’s a good thing, as we’re taking off tomorrow for a 3-day camping trip. All very coincidentally,  we will happen to meet up with my brother who is hiking the Colorado Trail. He’s 2 weeks in. I’ll be bring him more JetBoil Fuel which is in short supply this summer as the CT has increased traffic this year.

He requested his favorite hot dogs with sauerkraut, potato salad, and baked beans. While I won’t be making my mom’s recipe, I’m sure he’ll be happy. with Bush’s Baked Beans. I also found pre-mixed Bloody Mary’s for the next morning. He’s taking a zero day (no hiking) but perhaps we’ll go to Leadville which has quite a few geocaches. It’s the highest town in North America and just half an hour away.

In the meantime, I pray for everyone to make to make good choices. Wear a mask, don’t go to crowded events, and don’t be a whiny baby. Yes, many of us would rather be on a plane traveling to our vacation destination, but one summer of sacrifice is not asking a lot. My friend’s daughter is starting college next month. As much as I ‘d love to meet up with my friend for lunch, I’ve decided that’s not going to happen. It’s not worth the risk. We all need to make sacrifices to contain Covid-19.

I am getting my EasyJet refund!

Back in June I got notification from Norwegian Airlines that my round trip flight to London from Denver in the fall had been canceled. While they were encouraging people to apply for credits for future travel, I opted for a refund (it was buried in the e-mail at the bottom). They refunded me within a week.

Once I got notification about my flight cancellation with Norwegian, I immediately started working on getting a refund on an EasyJet flight I had booked for Barcelona to London. This proved to be a difficult task but after a lot of searching I found they had a Covid-19 Help Hub. Like Norwegian, they were pushing vouchers and discouraging refunds. But with some digging I found a refund request form. I filled it out and waited. After two weeks I had no response, so I filled out another one. Still no response. I knew calling EasyJet would be a difficult task. I had done that once in the past and it meant getting up super early as it wasn’t a 24-7 operation. So I decided to contact my credit card company. They told me they would give a conditional credit, but it was not guaranteed since it was a non-refundable flight. I pointed out that there was no way I could use this ticket (yes, this route is still being flown) and given the circumstances I felt it was a legitimate request due to pandemic.

Two days ago I finally got an e-mail from EasyJet saying they were processing my refund. I don’t know if this was because of my refund request or because of the action taken by my credit card company.

I have heard that other airlines such as British Airways are using shady tactics just like EasyJet to make it difficult to obtain a refund for American citizens, instead offering vouchers. Don’t give up! Since I first applied for my refund with EasyJet I noticed that they have changed the form and no longer have it up in the help hub. However, you might try this contact form.  Explain to them that as a US citizen you can no longer fly to Europe and request a refund. I believe they took the refund request form down because they probably got hit with a ton of requests and want to discourage people from asking for them. Don’t let that deter you.

On the trail again

Last Thursday, July 16, my oldest brother started hiking the 485 mile Colorado Trail. It’s part of the Continental Divide Trail (CDT), but not many people hike the entire CDT in one shot. It’s considered the most difficult of the 3 thru hikes in the US, which also include the Pacific Crest (PCT) and the Appalachian Trail (AT).

My brother did the PCT when he was 19 and 40 years later he did the AT. He had planned to hike the PCT again this year but then Covid-19 hit. (Hikers need to resupply and clean up at small towns along the route, and with the virus, many were closed down to hikers) So he decided on the CT instead. Colorado towns are open now so he’s keeping his fingers crossed than our numbers stay down and we don’t have any more closures. It should take him about 6 weeks. Younger hikers can easily hike it 4 weeks, but my brother is now north of 60.

He flew into Denver on Wednesday and we took him to the Waterton Canyon trailhead southwest of Denver on Thursday morning. He’s starting slow – 10ish miles a day – until he gets used to the altitude. We’ll see him in 2 weeks when we go camping at Twin Lakes. I had planned that camping trip back in January before I knew he was hiking. When he told me he was doing the CT, I remembered that the trail passed right by our campground. So we’ll bring him a resupply box and treat him to a beer and burger in Twin Lakes Village.

I’m following his progress on Garmin GPS upload. In Colorado cell service is pretty poor in the mountains so this is an essential tool for hikers. So far he appears to be on schedule.

Here are some pics from the sendoff:

Trip to Spain officially cancelled

I knew it was coming. First there was the news that the EU was not allowing travelers from the US. Then I got an e-mail from Norwegian Airlines. Our roundtrip flight to London-Gatwick in the fall was cancelled. While England is not a part of the EU, I figured that Norwegian would cancel the flight anyhow. The UK has announced that visitors must do a 14-day quarantine and not many people are going to want to do that.

Fortunately, the e-mail had a link to request a refund. I immediately filled it out and they have already sent a reply stating my refund has been processed and will be posted to my credit card. I haven’t seen it yet, but I’ll check every day. I’m keeping all my correspondence in case it doesn’t come through. Norwegian has had a lot of financial difficulties and I’m more than a little worried. We took them last year to Europe and while the price was good, the service was not the best. I swore I wouldn’t fly on them again, yet I get sucked in to another good deal before Covid-19 struck.

Now I just have to wait and see what happens with my EasyJet flight. It might not be cancelled (London – Barcelona) but I did manage to find a refund request form specifically for passengers affected by Covid-19. I hadn’t yet booked our return flight from Madrid.