Vacation Planning in the Pandemic

I was very fortunate to travel to Italy last September.  In a nutshell: my husband and I flew into Milan, took a quick side trip to Lake Como, then continued down to Florence for a few days, hopped on another train to Naples, transferred to the Circumvesuviana train to Pompei and Sorrento, and ended our trip in a wonderful 400 year-old apartment (updated of course, but still with original wooden ceiling beams) in Rome. So many wonderful experiences. We couldn’t wait to get back to Europe, with the planned destination being Spain (with a sidetrip to Morocco).

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Outside our apartment in Rome

Then Covid-19 happened.

Even my spring birthday getaway to Arizona got cancelled. Fortunately, however, I had made campground reservations for this summer. Campgrounds book up quickly for the weekends and typically you need to do it 6 months in advance. Fortunately, we’re allowed to go camping here in Colorado and judging by the line at REI the other week, a lot of people are opting for this.

We’ll be camping near Twin Lakes just south of Leadville. The campground is at 9,500 feet – I think that’s the highest elevation I’ve ever camped at. Leadville itself is the highest incorporated city in North America (10,152 feet).

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Lakeview Campground, near Twin Lakes and Leadville

As it so happens, my oldest brother will be passing through on the Colorado Trail (part of the Continental Divide Trail) that same weekend. It’ll be nice to meet up with him.

His hike also presented us with another opportunity to do another Colorado staycation. The CT terminates in Durango, about 6 hours from Denver. Since I volunteered to pick him up, naturally I decided to  turn it into a mini getaway. We’ll sightsee  on some of the scenic mountain highways and visit the former mining town of Silverton. We’ll also stay a night in Pagosa Springs. Their hot springs resort has been on my bucket list for years.

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The Springs Resort at Pagosa Springs – check this one off the bucket list!Silverton-Valley-COSilverton, Colorado

Once September comes (when we had planned to go to Spain) it would take nothing short of a miracle to make it to Europe. We still have our tickets as Norwegian Airlines has not officially cancelled our flight to London Gatwick. But we’re expecting that to happen. So in the meantime we’re talking about some things we can do here in the US. One is to rent an RV and do a road trip to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It’s a 2-day drive. I’m not sure if I could stand my husband’s driving. But it might be fun as we could bring our pug. He’s almost 12, getting up there in years, and he’s never been on a road trip. We’ll see.

In the meantime I hope you all manage to do something fun and still STAY SAFE!

Reopening: how’s it going for you?

My county in Colorado started a gradual reopening on May 8. That’s when hair and nail salons were allowed to reopen. Since then restaurants have opened but they are encouraging patio dining whenever possible, with inside capacity set at 50%. No worries for us. We’ve fallen into a take-out routine as we enjoy dining on our patio. My husband will be working from home until the end of July. I’m used to him being at home now. He was working from home about 50% of the time anyhow so it wasn’t a big adjustment.

So far so good in Colorado. We’re all holding our breath and praying that the protests don’t result in a spike again. The number of new cases yesterday was only 157.

Here in Boulder County mask usage in stores is mandatory. Outdoors is optional but suggested if you cannot maintain 6 feet of distance. They did close down one park by a creek that is popular for tubing because people were too close. But so far I think people are being cautious and smart about reopening.

Here are my experiences with reopenings so far.

Hair Salon – Grade: C

I had an appointment 4 weeks ago. My stylist (owner) and the other four woman who work there were all busy working, in some cases within just a few feet of each other. They all had masks except for my stylist. She had a cheap plastic face shield – no where as good as a hospital shield. She claimed she sanitized the station before I came in but it didn’t look like it. There was hair on the floor and it just felt unclean. With 5 clients and 5 stylists in a relatively small salon, I felt uncomfortable. People had to wait outside, which was good. But she had not informed clients so people kept on walking in and sitting down. I heard later that she should not have used a dryer but she did. The good news is I am still healthy.

Nail Salon – Grade: A

I was very impressed. They had installed shields everywhere. They are also not using stations next to each other to ensure social distancing. The technicians wore masks (not uncommon in nail salons anyhow). Just felt super clean.

Black lives do matter, but why is it taking so long? – Conclusion

In my final post in this three-part series, I want to first briefly recap why I feel the failure of busing in my home town, Portland, Oregon, set the tone for the decades to come. As mentioned, the program was strictly one-way. Black students from the east side of Portland were bused to white schools in predominantly white neighborhoods. Typically there were about 2 black students per class. For example, in my school we had 3 classes per grade level (K-8), with about 28-30 students per class. So we’re talking roughly 1 percent of the student population.

At the end of the day these African American students hopped on the bus back home. They weren’t invited over for play dates and didn’t participate in activities with the rest of us. The schools did what they were mandated to do, but generally speaking, most black students weren’t a part of the social structure of our school. The burden to fit in and succeed was placed upon their shoulders. A few somehow succeeded and actually decided to continue on to our high school instead of returning to their neighborhood high school.

One of those students was a girl in my grade. When Robin first started, she was a free spirit much like my black friend Monica from fourth grade. But as she continued she became more serious and conformed to “white standards” of behavior. I hate to say this, but as a track star who took home several state titles, acceptance by the white student population perhaps came a little bit easier for her as everyone loves a winner. She was elected our Rose Festival princess (this is a big thing in Portland) and went on to become the first black Rose Festival queen since the court’s inception 50 years earlier. After high school Robin went on to University of Arizona, continued with track, and even was the Fiesta Bowl queen one year.

People look at her and say, look, she did it, Robin benefited from desegregation and busing. But did she? Only she can answer that. My feeling is that her success made white people feel good because it helped erase some of their white guilt. It makes it easy to overlook all the other issues that busing failed to address. For example, why not spend more money in the schools black students attend to help give them access to the teachers and tools that white students have? Can you imagine if a white student would be told that he had to take a bus to the black community in order to get a good education? No, of course not. There’d be a riot.

And that is how we get back to Black Lives Matter. They are sick and tired of being treated different by law enforcement, especially the men. This has to stop. It’s been 7 years since the BLM movement started with the acquittal of George Zimmerman. What has happened in the meantime? Pretty much nothing. That is, until the death of George Floyd. This time we all saw on the internet and there was no denying it. But did it need to come to this? NO!

So, white people, pull your heads out of the sand and start walking the walk, not just talking the talk. The protests are a start. But we need to acknowledge the problem, and not be afraid to stand up and do what is right. Do not let this go away.

Watch your own behavior. Children learn from us. They’re like sponges. Do you say racist things without realizing it? Stop it. Do you avoid black people in public places? Again, check your behavior. Take your children to the “other side of town” and support black businesses. Advocate for black history as a year-around subject. One month is simply not enough.

Quit pretending you’re liberal and for equality when your behavior says otherwise. Case in point. I live in Colorado and the local college town, Boulder, is filled with Bernie Sanders supporters. The residents and college students are known for their liberal mindset and damn proud of it. But the reality is totally different Black students at University of Colorado have said many a time that the university is not inclusive. One student from another state told a reporter that she was excited to go to school in Boulder. The reality was far different that she expected. Not only was the campus environment not welcoming but residents treated her like an outsider when she was working in retail.

It’s very easy to join a protest with your white friends because it’s the trendy thing to do. But do it because you’re dedicated to cause. Learn and listen to black people on the Internet. I’ve heard so many raw and real stories. It may make you feel uncomfortable. You may be in denial. But until we admit that we’ve failed black people, nothing will change. Our discomfort is nothing compared to what they’ve put up with for hundreds of years.

Black lives do matter, but why is it taking so long? – Part 1

Over the course of the last week I’ve been thinking long and hard about George Floyd and the countless cases of police brutality towards African Americans. I’ve been on this earth nearly six decades, yet to me, I sometimes think very little has changed.

It’d be very hard to tell my thoughts in one posting, so I’m going to recount what I remember of  my experiences through several posts.

I grew up with white privilege in Portland, Oregon, although it took me a long time to realize it. Right before I was born my parents bought a house on the west side of Portland in a semi-rural neighborhood. My dad was a real estate agent and had done a lot of research. He wanted to get out of the urban area and be in a good school district. We had a big house, big yard, and good neighbors. Most of the people were professionals – several attorneys, one judge, and my dentist lived next door.  For the most part all white. One family was half-Persian (Iranian). But that was as exotic as we got.

But what was the real reason for our move to the west side, other than a larger house for our growing family? (I was the youngest of 4 kids.) My dad didn’t mince words. Portland was changing –  specifically, the east side, or the Albina district where my dad had grown up and where he and my mom first lived after they got married in the late 50s. During WWII most of the black families lived near the shipyards in an area called Vanport, but after the flood in ’48, those families were only allowed to move to certain areas of NE Portland (Albina). Then with the construction of the Memorial Coliseum in ’59 and Interstate 5 in the early 60s, more black families were forced to relocate to predominantly white neighborhoods in Albina. The great white flight to the west side and suburbs had begun.

As a young child growing up in the West Hills of Portland, I was indeed very sheltered from what was happening over on the other side of the Willamette River. Rioting, looting, and arson took place, with many business boarding up permanently.  In the early 70s my dad would take me over to the trendy new shopping center called Lloyd Center and we would pass by parts of Albina that were burned out or boarded up. My dad still knew people over in Albina and checked on them periodically. To me it was like a whole different world. I’m sure I realized I was lucky but I don’t think my dad said anything overtly racist. In fact, we had a couple fellowship activities with the Congregationalist Church over in Albina and I recall it as being fun. But beyond that, my interaction with black people was very limited.

That is, until Fourth Grade. That is when my new best friend was a girl named Monica.

To be continued . . .