Iceland – Fall 2017 – Nights 1 & 2 on the Southern Coastline

If you had asked me ten years ago if I wanted to go to Iceland I probably would have said no. But it started to pop up on my travel radar about five years ago after I saw an Icelandair jet at a nearby gate at DIA. It was at the same time that I starting seeing a lot of blog posts about it and knew I had to go. Fortunately, the stars aligned in 2017 and we were able to spend five days there on our way back from England, taking advantage of Icelandair’s “stopover fare” program that they were promoting at the time.

Our five days there were spent on the southern coast of Iceland, as well as doing the Golden Circle just east of Reykjavik. Now, it is possible to drive around the entire country/island. The total mileage is 828 miles on the main road. My friend and her husband did it during the summer, but we were there in late September and the weather was already starting to turn cold. Would I ever consider doing the whole loop? Possibly, but probably not. That said, we do want to come again. Next visit we would come in the mid-summer and visit Snaefellsnes Peninsula north of Reykjavik. And we’d also take a boat tour to go see puffins. They were gone by the time we got there. But the good thing about coming in fall is it is possible to see the Northern Lights (we did! But more on that in a later post).

Night 1 – Blue Lagoon

Our big splurge in Iceland was our one-night stay at the Silica Hotel by the Blue Lagoon. Its starting rate is $399 a night. That does include a premium admission to the Blue Lagoon, as well as use of the hotel’s private lagoon, and breakfast. If you’re on a budget consider the Northern Lights Inn. Or if you’ve got money to burn, go for the Retreat Hotel. It’s over a $1000 a night. Yikes. We actually ate dinner at Max’s Restaurant at the Northern Lights Inn. While we were glad we stayed at the Silica, its restaurant seemed a bit too fancy (and expensive) for our tastes.

The view from our room at the Silica Hotel

First of all, what is the Blue Lagoon? The lagoon is man-made with the water coming the nearby geothermal  plant where superheated water is vented from the ground near a lava flow and used to run turbines that generate electricity. The beautiful milky blue color comes from the high silica content.

The Blue Lagoon — Photo credit: Ivan Sabljak (Wikipedia Commons)

The landscape around the resort and surrounding peninsula is breathtaking with its moss-covered lava field. It’s easy to see why the land is this way. After we had checked into our room, we went for a walk and got soaked. The fine rain was coming down sideways aided by the wind. Fortunately, we had a heated towel rack and quick drying clothes.

Unbelievable landscape!

After dinner, we went and relaxed in their private lagoon. Honestly, this was as nice as the Blue Lagoon. Smaller, yes, but more peaceful, especially at nighttime. Sure you don’t get the mud mask and drinks like you do in the Blue Lagoon, but that pool is quite busy. With the hotel’s private one, we almost had the entire place to ourselves. We did visit the Blue Lagoon the following morning after we checked out, but just getting in can be a bit stressful. Bus loads of tourists come from Reykjavik and some people will even come over during a layover between flights. Even though we did it in the morning, the women’s changing room was quite crazy. You’re expected to shower before going in and for some reason the women take a lot longer than men. Plus I had trouble with my locker. So it took me nearly half an hour to get ready and my husband was ready in 10 minutes. . In total we were probably in the lagoon for 45 minutes. Sure the waters are mesmerizing, but I preferred the private lagoon at the hotel.

After having lunch in the café at the Silica Hotel (fast food is a rarity outside Reykjavik) we got in our car and headed up the Reykjanes peninsula, with my plan being to head toward Selfoss. It’s one of dozens of waterfalls in Iceland (foss is waterfall in Icelandic) and not too far from our next hotel in Hella. However, as often happens when my husband is behind the wheel, we changed plans and decided to go check out Kleifarvatn Lake, a little over half an hour away. Its rugged beauty was breathtaking and I’m glad we made the short detour to see it. We also managed to find a geocache here, so that made it worthwhile.

Kleifarvatn Lake

I had hoped we would continue on to Selfoss at this point, but once again my husband wanted to make a detour and check out the ruins of Selatangar. It is recommended that you have a car with high clearance (4WD) which we did, but upon getting there, I sort of found it disappointing. My advice is to skip it. By now it was getting late in the afternoon, so we decided to head to Hella. Although we did not get to Selfoss, I did get to see many other waterfalls. So fortunately I couldn’t be too upset with my husband.

Selatangar

Our hotel for our second night in Iceland was Stracta Hotel. Like the other hotels we stayed in outside Reykjavik, it had the simplistic Scandinavian style (think Ikea!). It was comfortable and clean, but the town of Hella is not too exciting. We went out looking for dining, and found most of the restaurants were closed on Sunday. We came across one diner-style restaurant, but opted out after we saw that all they served was horse-meat burgers (by the way, horse-meat is very common in Iceland but I just can’t eat it). We ended up eating at the hotel. You’ll probably do this at most locations outside Reykjavik. We did manage to find one bar with fantastic pizza, but I’ll save that for a future post.

4 thoughts on “Iceland – Fall 2017 – Nights 1 & 2 on the Southern Coastline

  1. Like you, we never really thought of Iceland until Icelandair started flying here. In June 2017, we stopped there for three days on our way home from Europe. It was expensive, but well worth it and we made the best of our time. Thanks for sharing. Allan

    Liked by 1 person

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